Wednesday, 5 December 2018

Dr Breandán Mac Suibhne, a Senior Research Fellow with NUI Galway’s Moore Institute, has won the Royal Irish Academy’s inaugural Michel Déon Prize for non-fiction for his book The End of Outrage: Post-Famine Adjustment in Rural Ireland. The award was announced this week at a ceremony held in Dublin. Dr Mac Suibhne receives a prize of €10,000 and will deliver ‘The Michel Déon Lecture’ in France in early 2019. His book was selected from a group of 76 nominated titles and a shortlist of six books. The category of non-fiction encompassed by the prize includes works of autobiography, biography, cultural studies, history, literary studies, philosophy and travel. Eligibility was open to authors of any nationality currently living on the island of Ireland who had published a non-fiction book in the period July 2016 to July 2018.  The End of Outrage: Post-Famine Adjustment in Rural Ireland, published by Oxford University Press, tells a story of struggles over land, and acts of duplicity, informing and violence that took place in a small community in nineteenth-century Donegal. The narrative focuses on a schoolmaster who turned informer on a secret society – ostensibly in order to protect a farmer, James Gallagher, who had acquired land from his neighbours in the immediate aftermath of the Famine. It is at once a history and a memoir as the author’s forebears were among those who had lost land to Gallagher, and Dr Mac Suibhne probes how his own people came to terms with their loss. The End of Outrage was The Irish Times Irish Non-fiction Book of the Year in 2017, and in 2018 the American Conference for Irish Studies awarded it the Donnelly Prize for Books in History and Social Science. Professor Daniel Carey, Director of the Moore Institute at NUI Galway, was among those who nominated the book for the Michel Déon Prize. Professor Carey, said: “The End of Outrage is a remarkable achievement – a brilliantly written and researched book that gives a hugely compelling account. It brings a new dimension to the writing of Irish history. As a work of style and storytelling it is worthy of Michel Déon.” Speaking after winning the inaugural award, Dr Breandán Mac Suibhne from NUI Galway, said: “NUI Galway has a remarkable tradition in the study of nineteenth-century Ireland—its economy, its politics, and its literature, in Irish and English. I was lucky to have been a Fellow of the Moore Institute when working on the book and to have had access to the wonderful resources and staff of the Hardiman Library, as well as the support and advice of colleagues in different departments and the Centre for Irish Studies. Galway is such a great place to think.” Professor Michael Cronin, Chair of the Royal Irish Academy’s judging committee commented: “We were absolutely delighted with the calibre of entries for this inaugural prize and feel that Breandán is a very worthy winner and one that Michel Déon would be proud of. The judges felt that The End of Outrage was a beautifully written, well told, compelling narrative and a very interesting way to look at a period of history.” Helen McEntee T.D., Minister of State for European Affairs, said: “I would like to join in congratulating Breandán Mac Suibhne and all of the shortlisted authors. The Michel Déon Prize supports modern writers of non-fiction and new artists who seek to develop and strengthen their cultural work. I am delighted that the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade has funded this prize, and I look forward to it growing as a key moment in our shared cultural calendar.” The prize, sponsored by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, reflects the work and interests of the French writer Michel Déon, a member of the Académie française, who made his home in Ireland from the 1970s until his death in 2016. The late Michel Déon was Adjunct Professor and honorary graduate of NUI Galway. Over many years, through his association with the discipline of French as Adjunct Professor in the University, he showed generous support for students there, and shared his vast collection of books (7,000) with the University Library in a gesture of great philanthropy and friendship. For full details of the prize visit: www.ria.ie/michel-deon-prize. -Ends-

Wednesday, 5 December 2018

The European Association for Digital Humanities (EADH) is holding its inaugural conference in the Arts Millennium Building and The Moore Institute at NUI Galway from 7-9 December. The theme of the conference is ‘Data in Digital Humanities’ and brings together and represents the Digital Humanities in Europe across the entire spectrum of disciplines that research, develop, and apply digital humanities methods and technology. The EADH also supports the formation of Digital Humanities interest groups in Europe that are defined by region, language, methodological focus or other criteria. Keynote speakers include Professor Elisabeth Burr of the University of Leipzig, and Professor Leonid Borodkin from Lomonosov Moscow State University. Christof Schöch, Professor of Digital Humanities at the University of Trier, Germany, and Co-Director of the Trier Center for Digital Humanities, will curate a roundtable session on the theme of data and digital humanities. Over 130 papers will be presented on issues such as the transformation of data for cultural heritage, use of data analytics in literary studies, natural language processing, data visualisation and modelling, and much more. Local committee chair and NUI Galway Lecturer, Professor Sean Ryder said: “We look forward to welcoming European and other international researchers who are working at the cutting edge of digital humanities research and practice. This conference will help us to understand the new roles that data is playing in arts and humanities scholarship and teaching, and its impact in the worlds of cultural heritage and the curation of knowledge.” Further details may be found at the conference website, eadh2018.eadh.org, or by contacting Professor Sean Ryder at eadh.conference.2018@gmail.com. -Ends-

Tuesday, 4 December 2018

NUI Galway students and staff recently gathered to celebrate the achievements of the Galway Energy-Efficient Car (the Geec) and in particular to mark its Technical Innovation Award win at SEM Europe 2018. For five years running, the Geec has offered a vision of cleaner transport, and it is now established in the international top tier for energy-saving motoring. The car is designed, built and tested by NUI Galway students from Mechanical, Electrical and Electronic, Electronic and Computer, and Energy Systems Engineering. Engineering students develop the car as part of their engineering studies, and also devote considerable free time to their creation. Every year since 2015 they have competed in Shell Eco-marathon Europe, where cars race for efficiency rather than speed. The students have improved the design of the three-wheeled electric car year on year. In 2017, the Geec achieved an energy score of 354 kilometres per kilowatt-hour over a 10-lap, 16 kilometre circuit in Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in London. This is equivalent to around 10,500 miles per gallon of diesel, or driving from Galway to Dublin for 12 cents, and ranked the NUI Galway team 13th out of 41 competitors. The success didn’t stop there - at SEM Europe 2018, the Geec won the Technical Innovation Award for the unique design of a bodywork feature that covers the wheels, and moves as the car steers, streamlining the car and decreasing air resistance substantially. This year, the team hopes to progress even further. A new team is working on a lighter chassis, upgraded electronics, and fine-tuned drivetrain for the 2019 car, mentored by lecturers in the College of Engineering and Informatics, and supported by the engineering technical staff. President of NUI Galway, Professor Ciarán Ó hÓgartaigh, congratulated all involved, past and present. “This is a great team of students! Our University is proud to have such motivated and dedicated students, whose accomplishments over the past five years have showcased NUI Galway’s internationally-competitive capacities in engineering and our impact in environmental technologies in the world and for the world.  Their talent and ingenuity has been reflected in their success this summer at Shell Eco-marathon Europe and we look forward to further success in the years ahead. With climate change now one of the most pressing challenges facing our planet, the work of finding new energy-efficient transport strategies becomes ever-more important. This is an example of how universities foster the knowledge and talent which can transform our world. Congratulations to our students, supported by the University’s academic, technical and support staff in the College of Engineering and Informatics and the Geec’s industry partners for their pioneering work with the Galway Energy-Efficient Car.” The Geec was sponsored in 2017 and 2018 by the Tony Ryan Trust through Galway University Foundation, Shell E&P Ireland, Jaguar Land Rover, ÉireComposites, MaREI, Blackstone Launchpad, MBW Bike Shop, CADFEM UK & Ireland, Mathworks, OutdoorLiving.ie, Tocana Plastics, Molex, EasyComposites, and Irish Ferries. Check out www.thegeec.ie for more details on one of Ireland’s greatest green innovations. -Ends-

Tuesday, 4 December 2018

NUI Galway’s Professor Henry Curran, Professor Colin O’Dowd, Professor Donal O’Regan and Dr Derek Morris, have ranked in the top 1% of Clarivate Analytics list of Highly Cited Researchers for 2018. The Clarivate Analytics list of Highly Cited Researchers for 2018 identifies scientists and social scientists who have demonstrated significant influence through publication of multiple highly cited papers during the last decade. Researchers are selected for their exceptional performance in one or more of 21 fields (those used in Essential Science Indicators (ESI)) or across several fields. Approximately 6,000 researchers are named Highly Cited Researchers in 2018 — some 4,000 in specific fields and about 2,000 for Cross-Field performance. This is the first year that researchers with Cross-Field impact are identified. Professor Henry Curran is Director of the Combustion Chemistry Centre at NUI Galway’s School of Chemistry and of the Energy Research Centre in the Ryan Institute. His research interest lies in the study of the chemistry of how fuels burn in combustors in order to increase efficiency and reduce emissions for a cleaner world. Professor Colin O’Dowd is Director of the Centre for Climate and Air Pollution Studies at the Ryan Institute, NUI Galway, and a Professor in the School of Physics, NUI Galway. Through his pioneering work in the field of atmospheric physics, Colin has become internationally renowned as one of the leading scientists in the field of climate change. Professor Donal O'Regan is a Personal Professor of Mathematics at NUI Galway’s School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics and an internationally recognised expert in the field of Nonlinear Analysis. He has written over 1,300 peer-reviewed mathematical articles, making him one of the most prolific authors in the history of mathematics in the world. Dr Derek Morris is a Principal Investigator in the Neuroimaging and Cognitive Genomics (NICOG) Centre and is Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Science within the School of Natural Sciences at NUI Galway. His research, which began during his time in TCD (2001-2013), is based on using genetics and genomics to understand the biological basis of schizophrenia and other common psychiatric disorders. Vice President for Research at NUI Galway, Professor Lokesh Joshi, said: “Professors’ Curran, O’Dowd, O’Regan and Dr Morris are outstanding in their fields and have deservedly earned respect and recognition globally for their research. We are proud of our colleagues and the way they reflect the vibrant and impactful research community at our university.” The Highly Cited Researchers data from Clarivate Analytics form a key component of the Academic Ranking of World Universities, one of the longest established and most influential annual surveys of top universities globally. For the 2018 Highly Cited Researchers analysis, the papers surveyed were those published and cited during 2006 - 2016 and which at the end of 2016 ranked in the top 1% by citations for their ESI field and year (the definition of a highly cited paper). This is the fifth year in a row since 2014 that Professors’ Curran and O’Regan have been included in this prestigious list, the fourth year in a row for Professor O’Dowd and the first year for Dr Morris. The 2018 Highly Cited Researchers list can be seen in its entirety by visiting: https://www.clarivate.com/ -Ends-

Tuesday, 4 December 2018

BioImplant Innovative Training Network (ITN) is an ambitious European Industrial Doctorate programme coordinated by NUI Galway, that will provide world-class multidisciplinary training to 12 early-stage researchers in the area of bioabsorbable medical implant development. BioImplant is being led by Dr Ted Vaughan, a Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Informatics, along with his colleagues in the Biomechanics Research Centre at NUI Galway, Professor Peter McHugh and Dr William Ronan. The research programme will target the development of next-generation bioabsorbable medical implants, which has been a strategic priority area for researchers at NUI Galway for the past number of years. Bioabsorbable materials are a category of biomaterial that gradually degrade when implanted in the body. These biomaterials have the potential to form the basis for the next-generation of vascular and orthopaedic medical implants, for example, bone screws/plates, as they can reduce the need for implant removal surgeries associated with conventional permanent implants. The BioImplant Innovative Training Network programme will tackle key technological challenges in this area by bringing together EU partners with leading academic, industry and clinical expertise to develop innovative biomaterials with application potential in vascular and orthopaedic implants. Speaking about the programme, Dr Ted Vaughan at NUI Galway, said: “The BioImplant ITN will provide a unique opportunity for 12 early-stage researchers to acquire world-class multidisciplinary training in the area of bioabsorbable medical implant development. Furthermore, the research programme will significantly advance current bioabsorbable material technologies and maximise their commercial potential for both orthopaedic and vascular implant applications.” The BioImplant consortium spans four EU countries, comprising of Academic (NUI Galway, Queens University Belfast, RWTH Aachen, IMDEA Materials Institute and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid), Industry (Boston Scientific, Galway, Meotec Gmbh, Aachen, ITA Gmbh, Aachen and Vascular Flow Technologies, Dundee) and Clinical (University Hospital Aachen) participants. The multidisciplinary training programme delivered to early-stage researchers during the BioImplant Innovative Training Network programme will enhance career development and employability, promoting their development into leading innovators in the European Medical Technology sector. The BioImplant ITN programme is worth a total of €3.3 million and is funded by the Marie Skłodowska-Curie Innovative Training Networks. -Ends-

Monday, 3 December 2018

NUI Galway was awarded the ‘Postgraduate Course of the Year in Business, Finance and Management Award’ at the recent national gradireland Higher Education Awards 2019 which took place in Dublin. This year, the prize was awarded for the University’s MSc in International Management programme. This is the second time that this programme has won this accolade, last winning best programme in 2013. Judges commented on the MSc in International Management being consistently strong throughout, and were impressed by its innovative approach and resources. The NUI Galway MSc International Management programme, delivered by the Management Discipline at the J.E. Cairnes School of Business and Economics, is highly regarded nationally and internationally as a programme through which students develop the skills, knowledge and global mind-set required for working in an international context with large multinational corporations or small born-global start-ups. This innovative programme ensures graduates are ‘work-ready’ and have developed their full professional potential. The Academic Programme Director, Dr Majella Giblin, said: “The Discipline of Management devote time to developing the student’s key skill-sets in team-work, business communication, research and business travel. A key learning experience for students on this programme is engaging in a week-long business assignment trip abroad, which in the past number of years involved travelling to Hong Kong to experience this business culture. Developing such employability skills is fast-tracking many graduates to excellent positions in organisations worldwide.” Potential applicants interested in applying to participate in the MSc in International Management can contact Dr Majella Giblin at majella.giblin@nuigalway.ie, or visit    l for more details. -Ends-

Monday, 3 December 2018

The new Professors lecture series at the College of Arts, Social Sciences, and Celtic Studies at NUI Galway will continue with Professor of American History, Enrico Dal Lago, on Thursday, 13 December at 5pm, in Room G010, Moore Institute NUI Galway. In his talk, Professor Dal Lago will contend that a comparative historical project focusing on the events and transformations that occurred in the United States in the period after the American Civil War and in Italy in the period after national unification can help us understand better the deep economic, social, and political changes experienced by the rural areas of the nineteenth-century Euro-American world. In this lecture, Professor Dal Lago will compare the Reconstruction U.S. South with post-unification southern Italy by investigating specifically the reasons behind the origin and expansion of violent practices of agrarian vigilantism and criminal activity in the cotton-producing regions of upcountry South Carolina and in the citrus-growing regions of coastal western Sicily. In comparable terms, in both the cases of upcountry South Carolina and coastal western Sicily, those violent practices were tightly related to both a regional agrarian past and the specific historical circumstances of the period between 1865 and 1875. Also in comparable terms, those practices led to the creation of two particular traditions of illegal violent activity – the first Ku Klux Klan and the early Mafia – which, although very different in character, served a similar purpose of controlling the agrarian workforce in areas characterised by the production of highly valuable cash-crops. Dr Seán Crosson, Vice-Dean for Research in the College of Arts, Social Sciences and Celtic Studies at NUI Galway, said: “We are delighted to continue this lecture series which provides a great opportunity for the University to make the general public more aware of the world-leading innovative research being undertaken in the college. This is the sixth speaker in the series which has featured contributions to date in the areas of social policy, education, political thought, online therapies, language transmission, and behavioural psychology.” -Ends-      

Thursday, 6 December 2018

Research Examines the Reception and Circulation of Nuns’ Writing during the Seventeenth Century A new article by Dr Bronagh Ann McShane from the Moore Institute at NUI Galway has been published in The Journal of Historical Network Research. The article uses new research methodologies and digital tools to analyse data extracted from letters written by and about English Benedictine nuns living in Brussels during the seventeenth century. The data for the analysis is taken from the project ‘RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing 1550-1700’. The project is producing a large-scale quantitative analysis of the ways in which women’s writing was received and circulated in the early modern English-speaking world and its database will be open-access from the project’s close in 2019. The project has captured data on a range of female-authored sources, including texts produced in English convents established in Europe during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Speaking about the research, Dr McShane at NUI Galway, said: “Network analysis tools and methodologies are shown here to illuminate the sheer breadth and diversity of the nuns’ letter writing activity. The networks highlight in a visual way the connections between the Brussels Benedictine nuns and the world beyond the cloister. This serves to enhance our understanding of the nature and limits of enclosure imposed upon early modern nuns.” Dr Bronagh Ann McShane is a social historian specialising in the history of women and religion in early modern Ireland and Europe, and is currently conducting a study of early modern Irish nuns, funded by the National University of Ireland. RECIRC is a European Research Council-funded project, led by Professor Marie-Louise Coolahan in the Discipline of English. It investigates the impact made by women writers and their works during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. The project runs from 2014 to 2019. To read the full article in The Journal of Historical Network Research, visit: https://doi.org/10.25517/jhnr.v2i1.32 For more information on the RECIRC project, visit: www.recirc.nuigalway.ie/ or email recirc@nuigalway.ie and follow on Twitter @RECIRC_. -Ends-

Friday, 7 December 2018

NUI Galway’s Professor Henry Curran, Professor Colin O’Dowd, Professor Donal O’Regan, Professor William Wijns and Dr Derek Morris, have ranked in the top 1% of Clarivate Analytics list of Highly Cited Researchers for 2018. The Clarivate Analytics list of Highly Cited Researchers for 2018 identifies scientists and social scientists who have demonstrated significant influence through publication of multiple highly cited papers during the last decade. Researchers are selected for their exceptional performance in one or more of 21 fields (those used in Essential Science Indicators (ESI)) or across several fields. Approximately 6,000 researchers are named Highly Cited Researchers in 2018 — some 4,000 in specific fields and about 2,000 for Cross-Field performance. This is the first year that researchers with Cross-Field impact are identified. Professor Henry Curran is Director of the Combustion Chemistry Centre at NUI Galway’s School of Chemistry and of the Energy Research Centre in the Ryan Institute. His research interest lies in the study of the chemistry of how fuels burn in combustors in order to increase efficiency and reduce emissions for a cleaner world. Professor Colin O’Dowd is Director of the Centre for Climate and Air Pollution Studies at the Ryan Institute, NUI Galway, and a Professor in the School of Physics, NUI Galway. Through his pioneering work in the field of atmospheric physics, Colin has become internationally renowned as one of the leading scientists in the field of climate change. Professor Donal O'Regan is a Personal Professor of Mathematics at NUI Galway’s School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics and an internationally recognised expert in the field of Nonlinear Analysis. He has written over 1,300 peer-reviewed mathematical articles, making him one of the most prolific authors in the history of mathematics in the world. Professor William Wijns is an internationally renowned expert in cardiology and a Professor of Medical Devices at the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences. Professor Wijns research focuses on interventional cardiology, more specifically on reducing the number of adverse cardiovascular events in high-risk patients. Dr Derek Morris is a Principal Investigator in the Neuroimaging and Cognitive Genomics (NICOG) Centre and is Senior Lecturer in Biomedical Science within the School of Natural Sciences at NUI Galway. His research, which began during his time in TCD (2001-2013), is based on using genetics and genomics to understand the biological basis of schizophrenia and other common psychiatric disorders. Vice President for Research at NUI Galway, Professor Lokesh Joshi, said: “Professors’ Curran, O’Dowd, O’Regan, Wijns and Dr Morris are outstanding in their fields and have deservedly earned respect and recognition globally for their research. We are proud of our colleagues and the way they reflect the vibrant and impactful research community at our university.” The Highly Cited Researchers data from Clarivate Analytics form a key component of the Academic Ranking of World Universities, one of the longest established and most influential annual surveys of top universities globally. For the 2018 Highly Cited Researchers analysis, the papers surveyed were those published and cited during 2006 - 2016 and which at the end of 2016 ranked in the top 1% by citations for their ESI field and year (the definition of a highly cited paper). The 2018 Highly Cited Researchers list can be seen in its entirety by visiting: https://www.clarivate.com/  -Ends-

Monday, 10 December 2018

Renowned RTÉ journalist and broadcaster Sean O’Rourke has been appointed as an Adjunct Professor of Journalism at NUI Galway.Mr O’Rourke, who presents the ‘Today with Sean O’Rourke’ show on RTÉ Radio One, will take up his new role in January. The role is honorary and Mr O’Rourke will continue to work in his current capacity with the State broadcaster, RTÉ. Mr O’Rourke is a graduate of NUI Galway (BA, 1977) and received an honorary doctorate from the University in 2011. Head of Journalism at NUI Galway, Tom Felle said: “We are delighted that Sean has accepted this post and it’s a strong signal of NUI Galway’s commitment to journalism education.  “Sean is a hugely respected current affairs interviewer and his forensic style has helped shaped the national conversation around many issues in recent years. He epitomises journalistic values of fairness and probity, and his work has made an indelible contribution to Irish democracy by holding those in power to account. “Students will be able to learn from Sean via master classes in radio journalism and in newsdays, working alongside one of the best journalists in the country,” he added. Sean O’Rourke said: “I’m greatly honoured by this appointment, having worked as a student journalist in NUI Galway long before the university began to offer courses in journalism. So much has changed since then in the way journalism is practiced and received, but at its core it is still about two things: asking questions and telling stories. I look forward to working with today’s students, learning from them and sharing ideas about how to serve the public.” NUI Galway has a long history of journalism training and in 2018 opened a new digital newsroom. A new dedicated radio broadcast facility was completed in November this year and new television facilities are planned for 2019. A new BA in Journalism and Ireland’s first MA in Sport Journalism and Communication are being launched in 2019. ENDS

Monday, 10 December 2018

Solving Darwin’s Dilemma: the mystery of when animals first appeared on earth  Animals may have existed on earth for hundreds of millions of years before they first appear in the fossil record, according to new research from NUI Galway, just published in the journal, Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology.  The international study, led by scientists from the School of Natural Sciences at NUI Galway, has shed light on a significant question which perplexed Charles Darwin over a century and a half ago. In his masterpiece, Origin of Species, Darwin had great difficulty in explaining the apparently sudden appearance of many different types of complex animals around half a billion years ago. This observation was based on evidence from the fossil record, but did not fit with his proposal that animals had slowly and gradually evolved from much simpler ancestors over a very long period of time. Darwin could only suggest that, for reasons then unclear to him, the earliest record of animal life on Earth was not represented in the fossil record. This conundrum would later be dubbed ‘Darwin’s dilemma’. The research team has shown clearly for the first time that the earliest and most primitive animals to appear on Earth would not have had body tissues capable of becoming fossilised - even in situations where exceptionally well-preserved soft-bodied fossils are known to have formed. The oldest known fossils of animals thus do not represent the oldest animals. Dr Breandán MacGabhann (now at the Department of Geography, Mary Immaculate College), who coincidentally shares his birthday with Charles Darwin, conducted the research for his PhD degree at NUI Galway. He commented: “For most of the fossil record we find shells and skeletons, but little evidence of the soft-bodied animals like jellyfish and worms that actually make up the majority of marine animal life. The oldest animal fossils are just impressions left behind by soft-bodied creatures on the seafloor, from long before the time when animals first developed the ability to make shells. We have never known how well these fossils represent these very early animal communities, largely because these creatures were quite different from modern animals, but also due to the fact that we didn’t understand precisely how they came to be preserved as fossils.”  The team investigated fossils of bizarre disc-shaped creatures called ‘eldonids’, which were collected from the edge of the Sahara Desert in Morocco. Their anatomy and preservation was carefully examined in NUI Galway, and also in labs in the USA - work which included using cutting-edge geochemical techniques to reveal precisely how different parts of these unusual soft-bodied animals had become fossilised. Dr MacGabhann continued: “As soon as we saw these fossils from the Sahara Desert, it was a bit of a ‘eureka’ moment - we immediately realised that, for the first time, we had known animals preserved in precisely the same way as most of the oldest animal fossils. We shipped over a tonne of fossil-bearing rocks from Morocco back to Ireland, and the entire team spent huge amounts of time working on this material in the lab. We used concepts and techniques from soil science, microbiology, and environmental science to demonstrate that these types of fossils only record and preserve the specific parts of the animal’s bodies which were originally made out of quite complex tissues like chitin and collagen. These body materials are not really present in most primitive animals, like sponges, jellyfish, and sea anemones, which of course would have been amongst the first animals to evolve.” Dr John Murray from Earth and Ocean Sciences at NUI Galway, who supervised the research project, said: “These findings confirm a suspicion that scientists have long held, but which they had struggled to conclusively prove - namely that the earliest animal ancestors most likely evolved during a protracted and cryptic time interval, long before more advanced creatures began to become preserved as fossils. Our work provides the extra time which Charles Darwin needed to account for the early stages of the evolution of animals and it solves a seemingly intractable problem which greatly troubled him when he was writing arguably one of the most important books in science.” To read the full study in Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, visit: https://authors.elsevier.com/c/1Y8-A73NzqkrB -Ends- 

Wednesday, 28 November 2018

Two NUI Galway based start-ups are the main winners of 2018 InterTradeIreland competition  Loci Orthopaedics based at NUI Galway have been crowned the overall winner of the 2018 InterTradeIreland Seedcorn Investor Readiness Competition, taking home a cash prize of €100,000 at the grand final held last weekend in Belfast. The team at Loci Orthopaedics, a BioInnovate Ireland spin out located in the Business Innovation Centre at NUI Galway, has developed an implant for the treatment of thumb base joint arthritis. The implant, InDx, is the first of its kind that fully re-creates the natural motions of the joint post implantation. Commenting on their win, CEO and Co-Founder of Loci Orthopaedics, Brendan Boland, said: “It is an absolutely fantastic feeling to win the overall award at the InterTradeIreland Seedcorn 2018 final. The competition has been an incredibly challenging and rewarding experience, and we would like to thank the judges and organisers for the expert advice and constructive feedback provided along the way. The prize money will prove invaluable in supporting our orthopaedic joint implant ‘InDx’ at such a crucial stage in its development and will allow us to invest in securing additional personnel and provide further support for expansion.” The other main winner on the night was HidraMed Solutions also based at NUI Galway, who won the Best New Start Category award and a cash prize of €50,000. HidraMed Solutions was one of the cohorts who completed the 2017-2018 BioExel MedTech Accelerator programme delivered by NUI Galway. Hidramed Solutions has developed a unique wound care solution for people who suffer from Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS), an inflammatory skin disease that causes draining lesions and non-healing wounds. Business founder, Suzanne Moloney is a HS patient and has spent 5 years researching and developing the product. CEO and Founder of Hidramed Solutions, Suzanne Moloney, NUI Galway, said: “We are thrilled to win the Best New Start Category Award, it is a real honour. The €50,000 cash prize will help us take our proposition to the next level and the entire Seedcorn process has offered us a platform to refine our business plan and our company offering, which has been a hugely beneficial experience for us.” Now in its 16th year, Seedcorn is Ireland’s biggest business competition for innovative new start and early stage businesses in any sector, from any part of the island. As well as a substantial cash prize fund, participants benefit from promotional, business planning workshops and mentorship support throughout the competition.  Congratulating the winners, Ken Nelson MBE, InterTradeIreland Chairman, said: “Seedcorn recognises and nurtures entrepreneurship, innovation and new ventures, and provides young companies - who are at a critical stage of their development - the opportunity to really put their proposition to the test. The quality of the business plans throughout the competition has been of an extremely high standard, and this year’s participants are testament to the innovation and entrepreneurial excellence of small businesses, North and South. I would like to congratulate Loci Orthopaedics and Hidramed Solutions and wish them every success in the future. We look forward to watching our 2018 winners grow and will be following their development with a keen eye.” To date, InterTradeIreland has supported over 2,300 enterprising companies through the Seedcorn process. With €238 million in new equity being raised by the companies which have reached the regional finals stage of the Seedcorn competition over the past 16 years, the competition has a strong track record of supporting early business start-ups to become investor ready. For more information about Loci Orthopaedics, visit: http://www.lociorthopaedics.com and for more information on Hidramed Solutions, visit: www.hidrawearskin.com. -Ends-

Wednesday, 28 November 2018

Hannah Durand, a doctoral researcher in the School of Psychology at NUI Galway, has received an Early Career Award from the International Society of Behavioural Medicine (ISBM). The award ceremony, which took place recently in Santiago, Chile, honoured ten outstanding early career researchers in the field of behavioural medicine. Hannah, from Kingston, Galway City, recently completed her PhD in Health Psychology. Her research, supervised by Dr Gerry Molloy of the School of Psychology and Professor Andrew Murphy of the Discipline of General Practice at NUI Galway, investigated the extent of and reasons for non-adherence to antihypertensive medications for treatment-resistant hypertension in primary care. She is the only Irish recipient of the ISBM Early Career Award in its history. Dr Anne Berman, Chair of the ISBM Education and Training Committee, said: “This award recognises an important contribution to the science of behavioural medicine at an early career stage. Recipients have distinguished themselves in their scientific or clinical practice career. This award is presented to Hannah Durand in recognition of her outstanding contribution to the study of medication adherence as well as her total career achievement to date. It is our hope that Early Career Award winners will go on to be world leaders in the field of behavioural medicine.” Dr John Bogue, Head of Psychology at NUI Galway, said: “The School of Psychology at NUI Galway has recently been ranked in the top 1% of psychology departments in the world – this award confirms that our standards of education and research are at the very top in international standings. We are very proud of Hannah’s remarkable achievement.” Hannah’s research was funded by the Health Research Board Patient-Oriented Research Award and supported by the Primary Care Clinical Trials Network Ireland. -Ends-   

Tuesday, 27 November 2018

Judge Dara Ó Briain helps select prize winners from Wicklow, Kilkenny, Galway, Carlow and Dublin schools and community groups Tuesday, 27 November 2018: Science filmmakers from Wicklow, Kilkenny, Galway, Carlow and Dublin were honoured at the recent Galway Science and Technology Festival Exhibition in NUI Galway for winning the nationwide ReelLIFE SCIENCE video competition. More than 1,250 science enthusiasts from 80 schools and community groups around Ireland entered the competition, and the winning videos were selected by a distinguished panel of judges including aeronautical engineer and astronaut-candidate Norah Patten, BT Young Scientist and Technologist of the Year 2018, Simon Meehan and comedian and TV presenter Dara Ó Briain, who said: “I was delighted to be a guest judge in this year's competition and see how much enthusiasm, knowledge and energy is pouring out of Science classes across the country!" A group of 24 third and fourth class students from Powerscourt National School, along with their teacher Rachael Kinkead, won first prize at Primary School level for their video ’Science and Me: The Skin’, presented by Laurie Ryan, Senior Executive - Education and Public Engagement with Science Foundation Ireland. Primary school runners-up were Gaelscoil Riabhach from Loughrea, Co. Galway, while Scoil Mhuire Gan Smál from Carlow finished third. Transition year students Emer Tobin and Katherine Morrow from Loreto Secondary School Kilkenny, claimed the Secondary School award, presented by Director of the CÚRAM Centre for Research in Medical Devices, Professor Abhay Pandit, for their short film about Rosalind Franklin, who was instrumental in the discovery of the structure of DNA. Sixth year St. Mary’s College Galway students Jakub Szymonik and Alex Polchowski were runners-up, while Skerries Community College fifth years Sam Enright and Adam Kelly were third. Seán Janson from Lackagh Foróige group in Lackagh, Co. Galway demonstrated the ‘Science of Smashing’ with equations, experiments and “tons of personality” to achieve first place at Community level, presented by Dr Muriel Grenon, Director of the science education and outreach programme, Cell EXPLORERS. Members of the Westside Youth Project in Galway City were runners-up with a video about volcanoes, while third place went to the Galway Parkinson’s Association for ‘Living with Parkinson’s’. Based in NUI Galway and supported by the Science Foundation Ireland Discover programme, the Community Knowledge Initiative, the CÚRAM Centre for Research in Medical Devices, the Cell EXPLORERS science education and outreach programme and the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, ReelLIFE SCIENCE challenges Irish schools and community groups to communicate science and technology via engaging and educational short videos. Since being launched in 2013 by NUI Galway’s Dr Enda O’Connell and a team of volunteer scientists, this challenge has been met by more than 10,000 participants in 350 schools and groups around Ireland. Special guest judge Norah Patten said of the programme: “I think this is a fantastic initiative because the students are not only learning about a scientific topic - they are also developing skills to communicate what they've learnt. These types of hands on, practical projects will be really valuable as they progress through to the next stage of their career.” All videos can be viewed at www.reellifescience.com. -Ends-

Tuesday, 27 November 2018

Students interested in studying at NUI Galway are invited to an Information Evening in Dundalk on Thursday, 6 December. Students, parents, guardians and guidance counsellors are invited to attend the event which runs from 7 to 9pm in the Crowne Plaza Hotel, Dundalk. The evening will begin with short talks about NUI Galway and the undergraduate courses it offers. Afterwards, current students and NUI Galway staff will be on hand to answer any individual questions in relation to courses and practical issues like accommodation, fees and scholarships, and the wide range of support services available to our students. The ever-increasing popularity of NUI Galway is in-part due to its innovative programmes developed in response to the changing needs of the employment market. NUI Galway is launching three new Arts degrees for enrolment in 2019. This includes a BA (History and Globalisation), BA Government (Politics, Economics and Law) and a BA Education (Computer Science and Mathematical Studies).  The University will also launch a new degree in Law and Human Rights for 2019 and Dr Conor Hanly from the School of Law will give a short presentation on Law at NUI Galway. The event will also have representatives from across the University’s five colleges available to answer questions about the programmes on offer, entry requirements, and placement and employment opportunities. St. Angela’s College and Shannon College of Hotel Management, both colleges of NUI Galway, will also attend the event. Members of the Accommodation Office will be on hand to answer any queries about on-campus or off-campus options, including the new Goldcrest on-campus development, which sees 429 new beds this year, bringing the total of on-campus beds to 1193. Sarah Geraghty, Student Recruitment and Outreach Manager at NUI Galway, said: “NUI Galway is dedicated to excellence in teaching and learning with a focus on developing highly skilled and employable graduates and dedicated to providing a positive, welcoming and inclusive student experience. The Information Evening in Dundalk is an opportunity for students to take a closer look at the opportunities available at NUI Galway and explore what it means to study at a world class university”. To find out more about the information evening in Dundalk, contact NUI Galway's Schools’ Liaison Officer, Elish Carr at 087-7794010 or email elish.carr@nuigalway.ie -Ends-   

Tuesday, 27 November 2018

NUI Galway’s Medical Orchestra will present a varied and rich progrmame of work to include the premiere of a five-minute original piece of music entitled Vena Vitae, as part of the Arts in Action 2018-2019 programme. The concert is in aid of Cancer Care West and takes place on Wednesday, 5 December at 6pm in the O’Donoghue Centre at NUI Galway. This original piece of music, Vena Vitae was composed and arranged by Máirtín O Connor and Garry O Briain that features a scientific background involving the sounds emanating from a chemotherapy machine as the infusion reaches the patient. The piece captures rhythms and the translation of sounds to musical notation and arrangement for all sections of the orchestra, described as “an Ode to healing”. The Medical Orchestra will be joined by an ensemble of musical guests including Jim Higgins, The Smiths, Carl Hession, Matthew Berrill and Mary McPartlan. Speaking about this special concert, Mary McPartlan, Artistic Director of Arts in Action at NUI Galway, said: “The orchestra has been in existence now for ten years and its main aim has always been to enrich and support the medical students, in reaching their own individual creative spaces, thereby supporting their overall wellbeing, their academic endeavor and their work in the study of medicine.” David O’Donnell from Cancer Care West, said: “Cancer Care West are thrilled to be the benefiting charity from this very unique fundraising event. Funds raised will help support cancer patients and their families who are attending our Support Centre on Seamus Quirke Road.” The medical students’ participation in the annual Arts in Action programme is one of the highlights of the academic year. The orchestra was formed from a close partnership with colleagues in the College of Arts, Social Sciences and Celtic Studies, which allows NUI Galway’s medical students to express themselves through their music and contribute positively to the wider community. Tickets are €15 with all proceeds going to Cancer Care West and available from www.cancercarewest.ie (News and Events), or on the door on the night at the O’Donoghue Centre in NUI Galway. -Ends-

Monday, 26 November 2018

A new report launched today (26 November) by safefood finds that parents view weaning as an exciting but challenging time as they deal with lots of information and advice when starting their babies on solid foods. The research was carried out by the Health Promotion Research Centre at NUI Galway. Dr Colette Kelly, lead author of the study and Director of the Health Promotion Research Centre at NUI Galway, said: “Weaning an infant to solid foods is an exciting time for parents but they can feel anxious about what, when and how to feed their baby. Parents want practical and clear information at the time they are starting to feed solids to their baby.” Dr Cliodhna Foley-Nolan, Director, Human Health & Nutrition at safefood, said: “The first two years in a child’s life is a critical time for growth, development and establishing healthy eating habits for the child and for the whole family. We carried out this research to hear from parents about their experiences of weaning their babies on to solid foods. A worrying factor is the reliance on commercial baby foods rather than confidence in their own home cooking.” In the research, parents were open about the many challenges that they faced: Choosing baby foods to introduce at the weaning stage can be confusing. Varying opinions and advice from grandparents, family and friends about what to do. Practical advice needs to be available when the time is right, not in the new born period. Weaning can bring up feelings of inadequacy, embarrassment and guilt for parents. Dr Phil Jennings, HSE Director of Public Health and National Lead for the Healthy Childhood Programme, welcomed the report, stating: “The findings further confirm the support that parents require at this crucial stage of their child’s development. Professional advice and support is available from public health nurses, GPs and practice nurses.”  The time to introduce solid foods is important - not before 17 weeks and not after 26 weeks (for both breastfed and formula-fed babies). This timeframe is recommended by health experts as before 17 weeks, a baby’s kidneys and digestive system are immature and may not be able to handle food and drinks other than milk. Delaying the introduction of solid foods beyond 26 weeks is not recommended because babies that are 26 weeks old need solid food to meet all their energy and nutrient requirements and the baby is now ready to develop important skills for eating a mixed diet. Other important advice for parents who are introducing their babies to solid foods is to: Always stay with your baby when he/she is eating to make sure he/she doesn’t choke. Never add any foods to your baby’s bottle (this includes rusks) as this can cause choking and can damage teeth. Avoid foods and drinks high in fat, salt or sugar as they encourage unhealthy food preferences which persist through life. From six months, babies should be introduced to drinking from a cup or beaker. Tap water can be offered to your baby in a cup at meal and snack times. Cow’s milk (full fat) can be offered as a drink from one year onwards. Use foods that you would normally eat as a family - there is no need to go out and buy special weaning foods, however be mindful of the salt content when making family meals especially when adding stock or gravy granules to dishes. While commercial baby foods can be convenient for when you are out and about, these should be the exception and not every day. Allow plenty of time for feeding, particularly at first. Until now your baby has only known food that comes in a continuous flow from a nipple or teat. Your baby needs to learn to move solid food from the front of the tongue to the back in order to swallow it. The food tastes and feels different – it’s bound to take time so don’t be surprised if baby initially spits the food out or appears to dislike it. It will take time for baby to become used to new tastes and textures. Encourage babies to be involved at mealtimes, eat a variety of foods, hold finger foods and spoons and encourage them to try and feed themselves. Avoid distractions at mealtimes such as televisions, phones or tablets. Mealtimes are an ideal opportunity to interact with baby. The research was funded by safefood and was led by NUI Galway in collaboration with Queen’s University Belfast. The NUI Galway research report, What parents think about weaning - An island of Ireland study is available to download from https://www.safefood.eu/Home.aspx  -Ends-

Monday, 26 November 2018

Galway City Council and Gaillimh le Gaeilge have announced that Dr John Walsh, Roinn na Gaeilge and Dr Dorothy Ní Uigín, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, NUI Galway will lead a team of experts in language planning over the next few months to prepare a seven-year Irish Language Plan for Galway City 2019-2026. The objective of the Irish Language Plan, in line with Government policy, is to increase on an incremental basis, the communicative use and knowledge of Irish in Galway city as a community language. A new steering Group, Coiste Stiúrtha Pleanála Teanga Gaillimh (CSPT Gaillimh), was jointly established by Gaillimh le Gaeilge and Galway City Council to support, guide and oversee the progress and the delivery of an Irish Language Plan for the city. Members of the Coiste represent a broad cross-section of the public, private, community and voluntary sectors in Galway city. Speaking about the work ahead, Dr John Walsh, NUI Galway, says: “Over the next few months, we look forward to working with Coiste Stiúrtha Pleanála Teanga Gaillimh, to ensure that we deliver a successful language plan for the city. The planning project will comprise two phases; firstly a review of existing relevant research and international best practice and secondly a consultation exercise with relevant stakeholders and interested parties. We also hope to gain a better understanding of the needs and desires of the Irish language networks already operating in the city.” Speaking on the Irish Language Plan, Galway City Council Chief Executive, Brendan McGrath says: “Galway City Council is very pleased to be involved with this initiative for Galway city. It will provide an effective structure and a resource base for sustainable Irish language planning in Galway city for the period 2019-2026 and beyond.” Cathaoirleach Ghaillimh le Gaeilge, Bernadette Mullarkey says: “This is an exciting time ahead not only for the Irish language but also for Galway City. As members of CSPT Gaillimh, we look forward to working closely with Dr John Walsh and Dr Dorothy Ní Uigín as we engage with the people of Galway to set out a range of practical, cost-effective, achievable initiatives with a specified timeframe in the plan. The clear objective of the plan will be to further promote, support and increase the communicative use of the Irish language as a norm in everyday life as well as delivering on Galway’s status as Ireland’s Bilingual City.” Dr John Walsh is a Senior Lecturer in Irish at the School of Languages, Literatures and Cultures, specialising in sociolinguistics. Dr Dorothy Ní Uigín, is Acting CEO of Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, at NUI Galway. She is interested in language teaching and acquisition. This Irish Language Project is co-funded by Foras na Gaeilge through An Roinn Cultúir, Oidhreachta agus Gaeltachta and Comhairle Cathrach na Gaillimhe. -Ends-   Plean Teanga do Chathair na Gaillimhe Tá sé fógartha ag Comhairle Cathrach na Gaillimhe agus Gaillimh le Gaeilge go mbeidh an Dr John Walsh, Roinn na Gaeilge agus an Dr Dorothy Ní Uigín, Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, Ollscoil na hÉireann Gaillimh  i gceannas ar fhoireann saineolaithe sa phleanáil teanga chun plean teanga seacht mbliana (2019-2026) a ullmhú agus a sheachadadh do Chathair na Gaillimhe. Is é cuspóir phlean teanga Chathair na Gaillimhe, de réir pholasaí an Rialtais, cur le húsáid agus eolas cumarsáide na Gaeilge mar theanga pobail i gCathair na Gaillimhe ar bhonn incriminteach. Bhunaigh Comhairle Cathrach na Gaillimhe agus Gaillimh le Gaeilge coiste stiúrtha nua (Coiste Stiúrtha Pleanála Teanga Gaillimh (CSPT Gaillimh) le tacú le agus treoir a thabhairt d’ullmhú agus seachadadh plean teanga do Chathair na Gaillimhe. Tá ionadaíocht ar an gCoiste ó na hearnálacha poiblí, príobháideacha, pobail agus deonacha i gCathair na Gaillimhe. Ag labhairt dó ar an obair atá amach rompu, dúirt an Dr John Walsh: “Le linn na míonna amach romhainn, táimid ag súil le dul ag obair leis an gCoiste Stiúrtha Pleanála Teanga, Gaillimh le cinntiú go n-ullmhófar plean teanga rathúil don chathair.  Beidh dhá chéim i gceist leis an tionscadal pleanála: ar an gcéad dul síos, déanfar athbhreithniú ar thaighde cuí atá déanta cheana agus ar an dea-chleachtas idirnáisiúnta; agus ar an dara dul síos, reáchtálfar beart comhairliúcháin leis na páirtithe leasmhara cuí. Tá súil againn chomh maith tuiscint níos fearr a fháil ar riachtanais agus ar mhianta na ngréasán Gaeilge atá ag feidhmiú sa chathair i láthair na huaire.” Ag tagairt don phlean teanga, deir Brendan McGrath, Príomhfheidhmeannach Chomhairle Cathrach na Gaillimhe: “Tá Comhairle Cathrach na Gaillimhe an-sásta bheith páirteach sa tionscnamh seo do Chathair na Gaillimhe. Tabharfaidh sé struchtúr éifeachtach mar aon le bonn acmhainní do phleanáil teanga inbhuanaithe i gCathair na Gaillimhe don tréimhse 2019-2026 agus thairis sin.” Deir Bernadette Mullarkey, Cathaoirleach Ghaillimh le Gaeilge: “Tá tréimhse spreagúil amach romhainn, ní hamháin don Ghaeilge ach do Chathair na Gaillimhe chomh maith. Mar bhaill de CSPT Gaillimh, táimid ag súil le bheith ag obair go dlúth leis an Dr John Walsh agus an Dr Dorothy Ní Uigín, agus muid ag freastal ar mhuintir na Gaillimhe chun réimse de thionscadail phraiticiúla agus insroichte, a bheas éifeachtach ó thaobh costais de, a leagan amach. Beidh tréimhse ar leith i gceist leis na tionscadail. Is é cuspóir an phlean ná úsáid na Gaeilge mar ghnáth-theanga laethúil a chur chun cinn, a chothú agus a mhéadú chomh maith le stádas na Gaillimhe mar Chathair Dhátheangach na hÉireann a chur i bhfeidhm ar bhealach níos suntasaí.” Tá an Dr John Walsh ina Léachtóir Sinsearach le Gaeilge i Scoil na dTeangacha, na Litríochtaí & na gCultúr áit a múineann sé an tsochtheangeolaíocht. Tá an Dr Dorothy Ní Uigín ag feidhmiú mar Phríomhfheidhmeannach Acadamh na hOllscolaíochta Gaeilge, in Ollscoil na hÉireann, Gaillimh. Tá spéis faoi leith aici i dteagasc agus sealbhú teanga. Tá an Tionscadal Gaeilge seo á chómhaoiniú ag Foras na Gaeilge tríd an Roinn Cultúir, Oidhreachta agus Gaeltachta agus Comhairle Cathrach na Gaillimhe. CRÍOCH          

Thursday, 22 November 2018

NUI Galway’s Access Centre and professional services firm Grant Thornton recently launched a Professional Engagement Module (PEM), a new and experiential module of learning. This experiential based model of learning focuses on the selection and engagement of professional Mentors and Access Students, (Mature and School Leavers) in the participation of a specifically designed eight-week module of structured interactive learning. As a result of taking part in the programme, students gain exposure to the professional environment, develop career skills and increase their career readiness. It is a combination of mentoring, time spent in the Grant Thornton offices, and workshops that combine to give the students self-belief around progression in education and in planning for their careers. Aengus Burns, Advisory Partner with Grant Thornton, said: “Grant Thornton recognises the responsibility for the social impact we have on the community we work and live in and as a firm is committed to making a real difference in the community. Grant Thornton is delighted to be involved with NUI Galway’s Access Programme.” The Access Programmes, which Grant Thornton has become involved with, target students in the community who have the ability to benefit from and succeed in higher education but who, for a variety of social and economic reasons, are under-represented at third level. Designing and leading the initiative for NUI Galway, Dr Mary Surlis said: “Grant Thornton PEM offers a very exciting opportunity to our students to engage in a professional setting, and to experience the support and encouragement of dedicated committed professionals, this will benefit our students enormously.” -Ends-

Wednesday, 21 November 2018

The NUI Galway Youth Academy, an outreach programme aimed at 9-12 year olds, recently received a gift of €250,000 over the next six years from Merit Medical, a leading multi-national medical device company with significant operations in Galway, employing close to 1,000 people. The gift was announced at the recent Youth Academy graduation ceremony which took place on campus. The Youth Academy programme provides children with a taste of university life and the opportunity to study a fun but high level course in a college subject area. The initiative was established by NUI Galway’s Mary Dempsey, Vice Dean, College of Engineering and Informatics, Dr Caroline Heary, School of Psychology, and Dr Lorraine McIlrath, Community Knowledge Initiative, to enhance the educational potential of children and inspire progression to higher education. Since piloted in 2012, enrolments have grown from 64 participants in its first year to nearly 700 participants per annum. The number of courses on offer has increased 10 fold and 66% of the courses are offered in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) subject areas. The reach has expanded beyond Galway with participants often travelling from Mayo, Roscommon, Westmeath, Offaly and Clare for the Saturday morning classes. Mary Dempsey, Senior Lecturer and co-founder of the Youth Academy, said: “A guiding principle of NUI Galway’s Youth Academy programme is to offer 25% of places on a full scholarship basis and provide children and inter-generational families with access to the university campus, its resources and knowledge, and encourage a sense of belonging. Although the programme has supported hundreds of scholarships since 2012, the very generous gift from Merit Medical will create early educational intervention scaffolds and higher educational pathways for many more deserving children over the next six years. I am very grateful to Mark Butler and his team for supporting NUI Galway’s Youth Academy programme in the provision of equality of opportunity for all children. This unique partnership will enable the NUI Galway Youth Academy programme to continue to develop, impact positively on children and combat disadvantage.” Mark Butler, Executive Vice President, European Operations, Research and Development, and Strategy, Merit Medical, said: “As a worldwide leader in the development, manufacture and distribution of medical devices, Merit Medical are proud to partner with NUI Galway’s Youth Academy programme. At Merit Medical we believe in children, their fantastic view of the world, their talent, their creativity and passion for innovation. It is important to capture this creativity from a young age, to ignite imagination and power curiosity. Through the academy the interest and enthusiasm for STEM subjects and related areas are increased, building the next generation of Scientists, Engineers and Mathematicians. “The Merit Story started with a single idea, build a stronger, safer disposable syringe, from that single idea the next great healthcare company was born. Today Merit holds over 800 patents and pending applications representing thousands of inventions. So who knows what the future will bring for children graduating from this Youth Academy programme. We are hopeful it will have given participants a broader perspective on all the fantastic opportunities awaiting them in the world of STEM. We encourage them to work harder in school and to realise that anything is possible and you’re never too young to think Big!” For further information, please visit https://youthacademy.nuigalway.ie/ -Ends-

Wednesday, 21 November 2018

CÚRAM, the Science Foundation Ireland Centre for Research in Medical Devices based at NUI Galway and Galway Film Centre’s 2018 ‘Science on Screen’ documentary, A Tiny Spark will have its world premiere at Pálás Cinema in Galway on Saturday, 1 December at 1pm. Directed by Niamh Heery and produced by Caroline Kealy of Swansong Films, A Tiny Spark examines the effect of cerebrovascular illness and stroke on people’s lives and specifically looks at research into the blood clots that cause stroke. With a mixture of dramatic first person accounts and beautiful animation sequences highlighting the functions of the various parts of the brain, A Tiny Spark is a film about science’s ability to affect real change for human life. A Tiny Spark focuses on stroke and cerebrovascular research being led by Neuroscientist, Dr Karen Doyle from CÚRAM and Galway Neuroscience Centre in NUI Galway, which involves analysis of removed blood clots to see what information they may yield. This is the first study of its kind in the world and is an international collaborative study between NUI Galway, hospital partners in Beaumont Hospital and throughout Europe, and the Mayo Clinic in the US. The research is carried out in partnership with Cerenovus. This documentary highlights the groundbreaking research being carried out by Dr Doyle and her research team at NUI Galway. For the first time ever they are analysing thousands of stroke-causing blood clots collected from patients around the world. These little bundles of cells could carry a wealth of information, which could point to big improvements to people’s lives by improving stroke prevention and treatment. In the film we meet three incredibly brave stroke survivors who show us that it is sometimes the little things that people miss in life after a stroke, or the small victories during recovery that mean so much. Contributors to the documentary feature individuals who have had a stroke: Rebecca Slattery from Limerick who had a stroke shortly after she turned 30 and became a new Mum; Trevor Neville from Limerick, a father of two who had a stroke aged 31; and Helen Liddy from Clare who suffered a stroke aged 63 in 2016. Dr John Thornton, Consultant Neuroradiologist, Beaumount Hospital, and Helena Heffernan, Stroke Group Coordinator, Irish Heart Foundation also feature in the documentary. Professor Abhay Pandit, Scientific Director of CÚRAM at NUI Galway, said: “This year’s film will focus on stroke and clot research which is yet another area of research which will have a significant impact on audiences all over the country. These stories, narrated through our Science on Screen documentaries, show the real challenges that people face when living with chronic illness but also how we are trying to address them here at CÚRAM, to improve quality of life for all.” Galway Film Centre Manager, Alan Duggan, said: “The Science on Screen commission scheme shows the real human side of the application of science. We are delighted to continue working with CÚRAM on this scheme and we will be supporting Niamh, Caroline and the filmmaking team in bringing ‘A Tiny Spark’ to the screen this year.” The 2018 ReelLife Science primary school winning videos will be screened before the world premiere of A Tiny Spark, followed by a Q&A with Dr Karen Doyle and her research team, and with documentary producer, Caroline Kealy and director, Niamh Heery. To view a short trailer of A Tiny Spark, visit: https://vimeo.com/291731458/072c556b3d To book free tickets for the world premiere on Saturday, 1 December at Pálás Cinema, Spanish Arch, Galway, visit: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/a-tiny-spark-premiere-screening-tickets-52811744349 The Science on Screen scheme has been running since 2016 and has awarded €35,000 each to three previous documentaries on topics such as Parkinson’s disease (Feats of Modest Valour), tendon injury (Mending Legends) and diabetes (Bittersweet: The Rise of Diabetes). The films have reached audiences of over half a million people and have received success at festivals internationally. Full details on all previous Science on Screen films can be found here: www.galwayfilmcentre.ie/category/science-on-screen and http://curamdevices.ie/curam/public-engagement/science-on-screen/. -Ends-

Wednesday, 21 November 2018

Competition about sharing the story of research in just three minutes, with three slides, in front of three judges Free audience tickets have gone on release for the grand finale of NUI Galway’s Threesis competition. The fast-paced event will feature a series of three-minute talks by researchers who will share the story of their research using just three presentation slides, with the winners to be selected by three judges. The final takes place on Thursday, 29 November in the O’Donoghue Theatre on campus from 5.30pm. A series of training workshops and heats have taken place on campus over the last number of weeks in preparation for the final. The initial 80 participants have been whittled down to just 12 finalists. Professor Lokesh Joshi, NUI Galway’s Vice-President for Research, commented: “Our university has some amazing people carrying out incredible research across all disciplines. Threesis brings some of these people on a journey which empowers them to communicate the story of their research clearly and concisely. The grand finale promises to be a really interesting event, full of fascinating, bite-sized insights into incredible research. Not only is there the challenge of time, but the participants have been tasked with using clear and jargon-free language.”  The NUI Galway Threesis finalists are: Conall Holohan, School of Natural Sciences and Ryan Institute – ‘Fat to Energy: A Naturally Circular Story’. Brigid Hooban, School of Medicine – ‘Evaluating the contribution of different sources to antibiotic resistance in the environment’. Edidiong Bassey, School of Business and Economics, and Whitaker Institute – ‘Technology as a tool for reform: A case of Tax Administration’. Eoghan Dunne, Engineering and IT and TMD Lab – ‘Preventing a wet problem’. Eoin McEvoy, Engineering and IT, Biomedical Engineering and Computation Biomechanics - ‘Predicting Heart Failure: Insights from Mechanical Engineering and Thermodynamics’. James Blackwell, School of Physics and Medical Physics Research Cluster – ‘Finding Brain Tumours using Ultrasound’. Sarah Carthy, School of Psychology and the Risky and Extreme Behaviour Research Group – ‘Counter Narratives for the Prevention of Violent Radicalisation’. Siobhán Morrissey, School of Humanities – ‘Enid Blyton: War and Nationalism’. Katie Gilligan, School of Medicine, Discipline of Surgery, Lambe Institute – ‘Engineering vesicles to carry a cancer suppressing message for the treatment of breast cancer’. Peyman Sadrimajd, School of Natural Sciences – ‘Saving our planet: 3 equations of Biogas’. Niall Ó Brolcháin, Insight Centre for Data Analytics, Engineering and IT – ‘Our environment, our health, our wellbeing’. Sarah Murphy, School of Medicine – ‘An Econometric Analysis of Growing Up in Ireland Data, to Look at the Incidence of Illnesses among Breastfed, Non-Breastfed and Exclusively-Breastfed Cohorts’. The Threesis competition was initiated at NUI Galway in 2012. It is open to all research students and postdoctoral researchers at NUI Galway. Finalists include undergraduate students, PhD candidates and posdoctoral researchers from across all Colleges on campus. The judges in the final will be: Lorna Farren, Director of Marketing and Communications at NUI Galway; Dr Sylvia Maretto, Research Office, NUI Galway; and John Crumlish CEO, Galway International Arts Festival. Professor Andy Shearer from NUI Galway’s School of Physics will act as MC for the evening. Tickets are available on www.eventbrite.com (type in Threesis) or on the Threesis website at www.nuigalway.ie/threesis. -Ends-

Tuesday, 20 November 2018

Students interested in studying at NUI Galway are invited to an Information Evening in Tralee on Thursday, 22 November. Students, parents, guardians and guidance counsellors are invited to attend the event which runs from 7 to 9pm in the Brandon Hotel, Tralee, Co. Kerry. The evening will begin with short talks about NUI Galway and the undergraduate courses it offers. Afterwards, current students and NUI Galway staff will be on hand to answer any individual questions in relation to courses and practical issues like accommodation, fees and scholarships, and the wide range of support services available to our students. The ever-increasing popularity of NUI Galway is in-part due to its innovative programmes developed in response to the changing needs of the employment market. NUI Galway is launching three new Arts degrees for enrolment in 2019. This includes a BA (History and Globalisation), BA Government (Politics, Economics and Law) and a BA Education (Computer Science and Mathematical Studies). The University will also launch a new degree in Law and Human Rights for 2019 and Dr John Danaher from the School of Law will give a short presentation on Law at NUI Galway. The event will also have representatives from across the University’s five Colleges available to answer questions about the programmes on offer, entry requirements, and placement and employment opportunities. Shannon College of Hotel Management will also attend the event. Sarah Geraghty, Student Recruitment and Outreach Manager at NUI Galway, said: “NUI Galway is dedicated to excellence in teaching and learning with a focus on developing highly skilled and employable graduates and dedicated to providing a positive, welcoming and inclusive student experience. The Information Evening in Tralee is an opportunity for students to take a closer look at the opportunities available at NUI Galway and explore what it means to study at a world class university.” To find out more about the information evening in Tralee, contact NUI Galway's Schools’ Liaison Officer, Caroline Duggan at 087-2391219 or email caroline.duggan@nuigalway.ie -Ends-

Monday, 19 November 2018

NUI Galway and University Hospital Galway recently presented the Tarpey Scholarships to students, Chloe Conlon and Fiona Geraghty. The scholarships are part of the Hazel and Tanya Memorial Fund which was established by the Tarpey family in memory of their daughters who tragically passed away. Hazel and Tanya Tarpey were sisters who left a long lasting impression on many members of staff who encountered them in the Diabetes Centre and across every ward and discipline in the hospital before they both passed away of a rare genetic autoimmune disease that affects the endocrine glands called APECED (autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy). Their parents, Tim and Mary and siblings, Ruth and Dermot wanted to honour the memory of Hazel and Tanya by fundraising to establish these two annual scholarships in their names. The memorial fund grants two annual research student scholarships in NUI Galway, one each in the School of Medicine and the School of Nursing and Midwifery. Chloe Conlon, a fourth year medical student from Sligo Town, was presented with the School of Medicine scholarship, with Fiona Geraghty, fourth year nursing student from Williamstown, Co. Galway, receiving the School of Nursing and Midwifery scholarship  Last year’s scholarship winners Grace Cosgrove and Cherie Tan also attended the presentation and expressed gratitude to the Tarpey family. School of Nursing and Midwifery recipient of the Inaugural Tarpey Scholarships, Grace Cosgrove, said: “I wanted to use the money generously provided by the Tarpey family to further my education in nursing and increase my skills at ward level so that my clinical practice would improve and that the skills I have acquired will directly benefit my patients. The Electrocardiogram (ECG) course taught me skills on carrying out and interpreting ECG’s. From this I have now gained understanding into different cardiac arrhythmias, their treatments and can now carry out ECG independent from a doctor. This has reduced waiting times for my patient on the ward and has facilitated prompt action in any abnormalities.” Cherie Tan, School of Medicine Recipient of the Inaugural Tarpey Scholarships, said: “The scholarship was used to attend the National Cancer Annual Meeting (NCAM) 2018 held in Singapore. The theme for NCAM 2018 was ‘Medical Informatics: From Big Data to Precision Oncology’. Through NCAM 2018, I learnt about how large medical data is synthesized to personalized medicine for individual patients in the field of oncology, an area which I hold special interest.” NUI Galway’s Professor Sean Dinneen who cared for both sisters said: “The Tarpey sisters left a deep and lasting impression on all who encountered them, especially because of their extraordinary courage.” -Ends-

Monday, 19 November 2018

Two NUI Galway start-up companies were in the US recently for the second annual Blackstone LaunchPad Powered by TechStars Bootcamp. The programme brought together entrepreneurial teams from across the US and Ireland to take part in an innovation bootcamp with access to world class mentors and content to further accelerate and develop their businesses.  LaunchPad, based on the NUI Galway campus, is a highly experiential entrepreneurship program open to students, alumni and staff offering coaching, ideation and start up creation support. The programme focuses on innovation and entrepreneurial education and training, entrepreneurship events and community building, and provides supports and funding for early stage student start-up companies. As LaunchPad at NUI Galway continues to globalise its programmes, offerings such as this bootcamp give early stage entrepreneurs access to one of the world’s most well-known and respected entrepreneurship accelerators across the world, Techstars. Techstars is a global leader in the startup ecosystem, providing a network with access to over 1.5 million founders, investors and mentors. Over the course of the New York programme NUI Galway start-ups engaged with a diverse mix of mentors, start-ups and potential investors at SAP Next Gen HQ at Hudson Yard in New York. The programme resulted in Bladecomp and Stericision start-ups benefitting from personalised mentoring, unique Techstars expertise and content and support from business leaders including Jean Case from the Case Foundation. SteriCision is a newly funded Enterprise Ireland project developed from the BioInnovate Ireland Fellowship programme based at NUI Galway. The team are developing an innovative medical device to reduce infection following surgery. Barry McCann, Commercial Lead for the project, commented: “Attending the Blackstone Launchpad powered by Techstars event was a tremendous opportunity for us to grow our mentor network and learn from some of the most successful entrepreneurs and investors in the US. We are extremely fortunate to have an entrepreneurship programme such as Launchpad on campus that can accelerate good ideas and bring them to a global platform.” BladeComp is a wind and tidal turbine blade design software. BladeComp provides a faster, easier and more reliable blade design process. The team includes Dr Jamie Goggins, Dr Edward Fagan, Dr Yadong Jiang and Dr William Finnegan from the MaREI Centre, Ryan Institute at NUI Galway. Needing a faster way of modelling blades and a framework for the novel analysis and design techniques developed at NUI Galway, the team built automated design software to meet this need. The team have recently used BladeComp to design next generation tidal turbine blades (among the largest in the world) for a leading tidal turbine manufacturer, Orbital Marine Power Ltd. Edward Fagan of the BladeComp team, commented: “The Techstars event was a fantastic opportunity to get feedback on what we’ve done so far, and advice on how to effectively take our venture forward. The experience, mentorship and guidance we received was more than we could have hoped for. LaunchPad at NUI Galway provide an invaluable service to the development of entrepreneurs at the University”. Speaking at the LaunchPad Global Bootcamp, Natalie Walsh Executive Director of LaunchPad at NUI Galway, said: “It is always inspiring to work alongside early stage entrepreneurships but to work with TechStars in New York City and watch our start up teams flourish and grow through the supports provided has been amazing. We will have unparalleled access to the TechStars network and content and we are very excited about the future of entrepreneurship at NUI Galway.” -Ends-

Monday, 19 November 2018

A major international conference on the topic of Extended Working Life policy will take place at NUI Galway on the 22-23 November. The conference entitled ‘Gender and health impacts of policies extending working life’ is based on the work of COST Action IS1409, an international network involving over 100 researchers from 34 countries.  The network which has run since April 2015 is funded by COST – European Cooperation in Science and Technology. COST provides networking opportunities for researchers and innovators in order to strengthen Europe’s capacity to address scientific, technological and societal challenges. The network and conference will be hosted by the Irish Centre for Social Gerontology in NUI Galway. Dr Áine Ní Léime from the Irish Centre for Social Gerontology at NUI Galway and Chair of COST Action, said: “This conference showcases the work of the COST Action network over four years and offers an opportunity to open up a debate on the complex issue of extended working life in Ireland. While working past traditional state pension age may be beneficial for many people in rewarding sedentary jobs, it may be more problematic for those in physically demanding work or those in precarious employment.” This conference will feature over 50 presentations on the gender and health implications of policies designed to extend working life. These policies have been introduced across Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries as a response to population ageing and anticipated increased pension costs. They include increasing state pension age and requiring increased contributions to qualify for state pensions, which have important implications for different groups of workers. Mairead McGuinness, MEP and Vice President of the European Parliament will give an opening address by video. Keynote speakers include Dame Professor Carol Black, Newnham College Cambridge, Expert Adviser on Health and Work to the NHS, Professor Chris Phillipson, University of Manchester, Professor Fiona Alpass, Massey University, New Zealand and Professor Libby Brooke, University of Melbourne. Mairead McGuinness, Vice President of the European Parliament, says: “With better diets and medical advancements, we are living longer and healthier lives. We are also working longer, a development which some welcome and others do not. This conference will look at the gender and health impacts of policies extending working life, an important and timely topic. We have seen significant changes in women’s involvement in the workforce. In Ireland before 1973, women who worked in the civil service were obliged to retire once married – things are very different today with women actively participating in the workforce. However, women today across the EU typically have lower pensions than men; for many reasons such as lower earnings; having part-time work or needing to take time out from their careers to look after family members. The contribution of women is sometimes overlooked, particularly in rural areas and on farms, where their work is not always recognised or counted.” There will be a roundtable session on Extended Working Life policy in Ireland on Thursday, 22 November at 1.15pm involving policy-makers and stakeholders including representatives from the Irish Pensions Authority, the Department of Employment Affairs and Social Protection, the Irish Congress of Trade Unions, Eurofound, Age Action and the National Women’s Council of Ireland. The conference will take place in the Institute for Lifecourse and Society, North Campus, NUI Galway on 22-23 November. To register, visit: http://www.conference.ie/Conferences/AddRegistration.asp?Conference=557 -Ends-

Friday, 16 November 2018

NUI Galway are organising a series of events to mark the fourth annual College Awareness Week, which takes place from 19-24 November. The campaign promotes the benefits of a post-secondary plan that supports students to become college ready and also showcases local role models. College Awareness Week aims to inspire and inform all students about the importance of having a post-secondary education plan. It advocates for students to have the choice to pursue the course best suited to their interests, abilities and dreams, whether that is a PLC qualification, an apprenticeship or a university degree. To celebrate the initiative, NUI Galway is teaming up with Archbishop McHale College, Tuam, Co. Galway, to launch the ‘Attract-Transition-Succeed’ project, which is a partnership between the University’s Access Programmes, Techinnovate Centre and the James Hardiman Library. The partnership will help build on the role of the NUI Galway Access programmes in developing educational models that will support and facilitate under-represented student groups, teachers, families, and communities to access and participate and succeed at third-level. Owen Mac an Bhaird, NUI Galway student teacher at Archbishop McHale College said: “We are delighted to be part of a nationwide campaign to promote the importance of post-secondary education. There are lots of options out there and College Awareness Week encourages people of all ages to consider further education as part of their future.” In addition to this launch, NUI Galway together with professional services firm Grant Thornton, are launching a mentoring programme called Professional Engagement Module, which will give students the opportunity to gain exposure to the professional environment, develop career skills and increase their career readiness. It is the combination of mentoring, time spent in the Grant Thornton offices, and workshops that combine to give the students self-belief around progression in education and in planning for their careers. Other events taking place during College Awareness Week will include: Talks from the University’s course coordinators to students in Further Education colleges studying QQI Level 6 courses about the pathway of progression to third-level. The launch of the 1916 Bursary Fund and Inclusive Centenaries Scholarships targeting students in the community who have the ability to benefit from and succeed in higher education but who, for a variety of social and economic reasons, are under-represented at third level. The University will celebrate the Access programmes during their Annual Awards Ceremony on Thursday, 22 November, and during the ceremony will officially launch the 20th anniversary of the Access Programmes in Galway which will take place next year. For more information on College Awareness Week visit www.collegeaware.ie. -Ends-

Wednesday, 14 November 2018

Dr Clare O’Leary, Phelim Murphy, Bernie O’Connor, Martin Hayes Over 1,800 students will graduate from across the five colleges at NUI Galway at the University's winter conferring ceremonies, which take place from Tuesday, 20 November to Thursday, 22 November. NUI Galway has also today announced the names of those to be conferred with Honorary Degrees at the 2018 Winter Conferring. The four individuals to be conferred during the week of 19 November are:  Dr Clare O'Leary - Consultant Gastroenterologist and an accomplished adventurer with a special interest in high altitude and expedition medicine Phelim Murphy – long serving GAA county and club administrator Bernie O’Connor - long serving GAA county and club administrator Martin Hayes - internationally-recognised traditional Irish musician Speaking on the announcement, NUI Galway President, Professor Ciarán Ó hÓgartaigh said: “NUI Galway is fortunate to be associated with many outstanding honorary graduates throughout its history and those being honoured at these conferring ceremonies form a particularly distinguished group. Each one has made an outstanding and distinctive contribution in their field. In honouring these exceptional individuals, we signal what we value in areas that matter to us and to our society – the role of sport and volunteering in rural communities, creativity and music, path-breaking women in sport. NUI Galway is very pleased to be in a position to recognise these exceptional individuals.  Their achievements speak to some of the activities in which we as a University are engaged – community development, culture and performance, and sporting endeavour. On behalf of NUI Galway I am delighted to honour them and their achievements in this way.” Dr Clare O’Leary – Irish gastroenterologist, mountain climber and adventurer. First Irish woman to climb Mount Everest and complete the Seven Summits. Also first Irish woman to reach the South Pole. Patron of Cork University Hospital Charity. Works as a gastroenterologist and general physician. Phelim Murphy and Bernie O’Connor - Both synonymous with Galway hurling for many decades, at Club and County level and pivotal figures in the development of the GAA.  Phelim Murphy – Chairman of Turloughmore Hurling Club, and member of Galway Hurling Board for many years. Former Assistant Secretary of Galway Hurling Board, Secretary, Team Selector, President of Connacht Council, Vice-President of GAA. Bernie O’Connor – life-long GAA colleague and friend of Phelim. Member of Oranmore/Maree Club. Served at county, provincial and national level on Hurling Development, Games Administration and Management committees. Manager of Galway Senior team in 1983, team selector of All-Ireland winning teams 1980, 1987 and 1988.  Martin Hayes - Renowned Irish fiddler from Co Clare and member of the Irish-American supergroup The Gloaming. Winner of the All-Ireland fiddle competition – one of only three fiddlers to be named All-Ireland Fiddle Champion in the senior division in two consecutive years. Member of Tulla Céilí Band. Active in traditional music scene in the U.S. and internationally. Winner of many awards, including TG4 Gradam Ceoil. The conferring ceremonies will take place at 10.30am and 3pm each day. -Ends- Searmanais Bronnta Geimhridh OÉ Gaillimh agus Céimithe Oinigh An Dr Clare O’Leary, Phelim Murphy, Bernie O’Connor, Martin Hayes Bronnfar céim ar bhreis is 1,800 mac léinn as na cúig choláiste in OÉ Gaillimh ag searmanais bhronnta an gheimhridh a bheidh ar siúl san Ollscoil ó Dé Máirt, an 20 Samhain go dtí Déardaoin, an 22 Samhain. Inniu d’fhógair OÉ Gaillimh ainmneacha na ndaoine a mbronnfar Céimeanna Oinigh orthu ag Bronnadh an Fhómhair, 2018. Seo a leanas ainmneacha an cheathrair a mbronnfar céim orthu an tseachtain dar tús an 19 Samhain:  An Dr Clare Murphy - Gaistreintreolaí Comhairleach agus taiscéalaí cumasach le spéis ar leith i leigheas a bhaineann le hairde mhór agus le turais taiscéalaíochta. Phelim Murphy - a bhfuil na blianta caite aige mar riarthóir contae agus club CLG Bernie O'Connor - a bhfuil na blianta caite aige mar riarthóir contae agus club CLG Martin Hayes - ceoltóir traidisiúnta a bhfuil cáil dhomhanda air Ag labhairt dó faoin bhfógra, dúirt Uachtarán OÉ Gaillimh, an tOllamh Ciarán Ó hÓgartaigh: “Tá an t-ádh le OÉ Gaillimh céimithe oinigh den scoth a bheith aige in imeacht na mblianta agus is cinnte gur grúpa ar leith iad na céimithe oinigh atá á gceiliúradh ag na searmanais bhronnta seo. Tá a c(h)ion féin déanta ag gach céimí oinigh daoibh ina réimse féin. Trí onóir a thabhairt do na daoine eisceachtúla seo, léirímid na luachanna atá againn i réimsí a bhfuil tábhacht leo dúinne agus don tsochaí ina mairimid - ról an spóirt i bpobail tuaithe, cruthaitheacht agus ceol, mná ceannródaíocha i spórt. Tá an-áthas ar OÉ Gaillimh a bheith in ann aitheantas a thabhairt do na daoine eisceachtúla seo. Léiríonn a gcuid éachtaí roinnt de na gníomhaíochtaí ina bhfuilimid mar Ollscoil páirteach iontu – forbairt pobail, cultúr agus taibhléiriú, agus éachtaí spóirt. Thar ceann OÉ Gaillimh tá áthas orm onóir a bhronnadh orthu as a gcuid éachtaí.” An Dr Clare O’Leary – gaistreintreolaí, dreapadóir sléibhe agus taiscéalaí Éireannach.  An chéad bhean Éireannach a dhreap Sliabh Everest agus na Seacht Mullach.  Ba í an chéad bhean Éireannach í chomh maith a bhain amach an Pol Theas. Tá sí ina pátrún ar Charthanacht Ospidéal na hOllscoile, Corcaigh. Is gaistreintreolaí agus lia ginearálta í. Phelim Murphy agus Bernie O'Connor - Tá an bheirt fhear seo luaite le hiománaíocht na Gaillimhe le blianta fada, ag leibhéal Club agus Contae, agus is pearsana an-tábhachtach iad i bhforbairt an CLG.  Phelim Murphy – Cathaoirleach Chlub Iománaíochta an Turlaigh Mhóir agus ball de Bhord Iománaíochta na Gaillimhe le blianta fada.  Iar-Rúnaí Cúnta ar Bhord Iománaíochta na Gaillimhe, Rúnaí, Roghnóir, Uachtarán Chomhairle Connacht, Leas-Uachtarán CLG. Bernie O’Connor – comhghleacaí GLG agus cara buan le Phelim.  Ball de Chlub Órán Mór/Mheáraí.  D’oibrigh sé ar leibhéal contae, cúige agus náisiúnta ar Fhorbairt Iománaíochta, Riarachán Cluichí agus Coistí Bainistíochta.  Bainisteoir ar Fhoireann Sinsir na Gaillimhe in 1983, roghnóir ar na foirne a bhuaigh Craobh na hÉireann in 1980, 1987 agus 1988.  Martin Hayes - Fidléir Éireannach mór le rá as Co. an Chláir agus ball den sárghrúpa Gael-Meiriceánach The Gloaming. Buaiteoir Chraobh na hÉireann ar an bhfidil – duine de thriúr fidléirí a ainmníodh mar Sheaimpín na hÉireann ar an bhfidil sa rannóg shinsearach dhá bhliain as a chéile. Ball de Bhanna Céilí na Tulaí. Gníomhach i saol an cheoil thraidisiúnta i Meiriceá agus go hidirnáisiúnta. Is iomaí gradam atá buaite aige, lena n-áirítear Gradam Ceoil TG4. Beidh na searmanais bhronnta ar siúl ag 10.30am agus ag 3pm gach lá. -Críoch-

Tuesday, 13 November 2018

As part of National Science Week Ireland, NUI Galway’s O’Donoghue Centre for Drama, Theatre and Performance will host the free event NanoDance, exploring the science of the very small through dance theatre on 15-16 November at 6pm. Explore the world of nanoscience with dance and theatre! This multimedia production will examine the science of the very small through choreography, lighting and projections devised by visiting artist Deidre Cavazzi, Dance Department Chair, Saddleback College. The performance will be preceded by a short Nanoscience talk by Dr Jessamyn Fairfield from the School of Physics at NUI Galway. Eight performers, current and alumni students of NUI Galway, will take to the stage, bringing to life concepts like quantum confinement, wave/particle duality, and the relationship between frequencies and memristors.  This production provides a fun and creative way to merge scientific concepts with multimedia performance. Choreographer Deidre Cavazzi, a visiting fellow from Southern California, specialises in designing interdisciplinary productions to explore scientific concepts through live performances.  Deidre Cavazzi, said: “It has been exciting to work with NUI Galway and Dr Fairfield’s lab to develop this project. I hope to create an immersive and interesting environment for audiences to learn more about nanoscience while also enjoying a theatrical performance.” This work is supported by the Institute of Physics and Galway Science and Technology Festival. Performance will be approximately 75 minutes with no intermission, and is appropriate for all ages. Admission is free and pre-booking of tickets is advised by visiting www.eventbrite.ie and type in Nanodance, or visit: https://www.eventbrite.ie/e/nanodance-tickets-52221724584.  To view videos from recent interdisciplinary productions, please visit Deidre Cavazzi’s ArchiTexture Dance Company website: http://www.architexturedance.org/interdisciplinary-projects.html. -Ends-

Tuesday, 13 November 2018

The winners of the nationwide ReelLIFE SCIENCE video competition were announced as part of national Science Week 2018. Winners of the €1000 awards were Powerscourt National School, Co. Wicklow, Loreto Secondary School, Kilkenny, and Lackagh Foróige group from Co. Galway. Winning videos were selected from a total of 175 entries from 80 schools and community groups around Ireland, by a panel of judges including aeronautical engineer and astronaut-candidate Norah Patten, BT Young Scientist and Technologist of the Year 2018, Simon Meehan and comedian and TV presenter Dara Ó Briain, who said: “I was delighted to be a guest judge in this year's competition and see how much enthusiasm, knowledge and energy is pouring out of Science classes across the country!" A group of 24 third and fourth class students from Powerscourt National School gave an entertaining and educational account of the body’s largest organ in ’Science and Me: The Skin’. Loreto Secondary School, Kilkenny transition year students, Emer Tobin and Katherine Morrow, depicted the life of Rosalind Franklin, who was instrumental in the discovery of the structure of DNA. Lackagh Foróige group member Sean Janson demonstrated the ‘Science of Smashing’ with equations, experiments and personality. The competition is organised by NUI Galway and supported by the Science Foundation Ireland Discover programme, the Community Knowledge Initiative, CÚRAM Centre for Research in Medical Devices, and the National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science at the University. ReelLIFE SCIENCE challenges Irish schools and community groups to communicate science and technology via engaging and educational short videos. Since being launched in 2013 by Dr Enda O’Connell and a team of volunteer scientists, this challenge has been met by more than 10,000 participants in 350 schools and groups around Ireland. Special guest judge Norah Patten said of the programme: “I think this is a fantastic initiative because the students are not only learning about a scientific topic - they are also developing skills to communicate what they’ve learnt. These types of hands on, practical projects will be really valuable as they progress through to the next stage of their career.” Other prize winners included: Gaelscoil Riabhach from Loughrea, Co. Galway Scoil Mhuire gan Smál from Carlow Mary’s College Galway Skerries Community College from Dublin Westside Youth Project from Galway Galway Parkinsons Association All videos can be viewed at www.reellifescience.com  and will be shown to the general public as part of the Galway Science and Technology Exhibition, held in NUI Galway on Sunday, 25 November. -Ends-